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Greece: Experience Athens and Rome

Minimum Passengers 2
Category Multiple Countries
Duration 7 days / 6 nights
Available Dates
Apr, 2017 28
May, 2017 12,26
Jun, 2017 9,23
Jul, 2017 14,28
Aug, 2017 11,25
Sep, 2017 8,22
Oct, 2017 6,27
*Always small groups, 10 - 14 people.


Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Available



Tour Includes: 

• Personalized meet & assist upon arrival at the airport 
• Arrival transfer and departure transfers
• 3 nights in Athens at Titania Hotel or similar
• 3 nights in Rome at Diana Hotel or similar 
• Daily breakfast 
• City tour of Athens
• Visit the site of Acropolis
• City tour of Rome - Hop-On Hop-Off 
• Espresso, Gelato, and Tiramisu Food Tour 
• Tour of Imperial Rome 
• Visit the Roman Forum
• Guided visit of the Colsseum 

Not Included:

• Flight from Athens to Rome
• Personal expenses
• City taxes
• Optional tours
• Any room service, telephone charges, mini bar, gratuities, or tips

IMPORTANT NOTICE:About our Tours 
UPGRADED HOTELS AVAILABLE (for an additional fee)
* All tours and entrance fees are included.
* All taxes are included and NO HIDDEN FEES
* International Airfare is not included, but we can book it for you at very competitive rates.
* A transfer fee may be assessed for alterations to packages, itineraries/tours and suggested arrival/departure dates.


* Prices are per person and based on double occupancy. All prices are expressed in US dollars. Prices for vacation packages are subject to change without notice. All travel documents are the responsibility of the passenger. A valid passport with at least 6 months validity after the date of travel is required. Travel insurance is highly recommended.

Day 1: Arrival - Athens

Upon arrival at Athens International Airport, a representative will be waiting for you and will transfer you to your hotel. 

Overnight in Athens. 

Day 2: Athens

Begin your morning with breakfast at your hotel.

Today, you will enjoy a half day tour of Athens. You will visit the site of Acropolis. This tour gives you an opportunity to observe the striking contrasts that make Athens such a fascinating city. Our expert guides will take you to see the Panathenaic Stadium where the first Olympic Games of modern times were held in 1896.  Continue and pass by the Prime Minister's residence (ex Royal Palace) guarded by the Euzones in their colorful uniform, the Temple of Olympian Zeus, the Hadrian's Arch, the Parliament and the memorial to the Unknown Soldier, the Academy, the University, the National Library, the Constitution Square (Syntagma).

Continue and pass by the Prime Minister's residence guarded by the Euzones in their colorful uniform, the Temple of Olympian Zeus, the Hadrian's Arch, the Parliament. Other sites include the memorial to the Unknown Soldier, the Academy, the University, the National Library, the Constitution Square (Syntagma).

At the Acropolis, visit the architectural masterpieces of the Golden Age of Athens: the Propylaea, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erechtheion, and the Parthenon.  

Overnight in Athens. 

Meals : Breakfast
Day 3: Athens

Begin your morning with breakfast at your hotel.

Enjoy your free day by strolling along Plaka with its narrow streets, which are full of traditional restaurants where you can taste typical dishes of Greek cuisine, drink the famous “ouzo” and enjoy the atmosphere of this vibrant neighborhood at your own leisure.   

You may also choose to go on a one-day cruise (optional, not included). Departure from the hotel in the morning with a guide towards the port of Piraeus. The ship sails at 8:00 AM to the islands of the Saronic Gulf.

Visit each island on your own leisure. Aegina is the biggest island of the Saronic Gulf. The two major attractions to visit in Aegina are the Monastery of Agios Nektarios and the Temple of Aphaia. Poros is the smallest of the three islands, full of pine and lemon trees, where you are going to have a nice walk and enjoy the great scenery. Hydra is one of the most cosmopolitan and picturesque Greek islands, with a unique architecture, narrow streets, and many shops. 
Please note: Optional tours can be organized on board of the ship for each island. 

Overnight in Athens. 

Meals : Breakfast
Day 4: Athens - Rome

Begin your morning with breakfast at your hotel.

Today, you will be flying from Athens to Rome (flight not included, to be booked by agent).

Upon arrival at Fiumicino Airport in Rome, you will be met and transferred by one of our representatives to your hotel. 

Overnight in Rome.

Meals : Breakfast
Day 5: Rome

Begin your morning with breakfast at your hotel. 

Start the day with a panoramic view of the eternal city of Rome. Hop on and off the bus at your leisure, creating your own itinerary. Listen to interesting and informative commentary through your own individual headphones - several languages available.
Discover the ancient and modern beauty of Rome. See the Colosseum, St. Peter's Basilica, the Roman Forum, the Vatican, and the Trevi Fountain to name a few. Pink buses are on the move all day long, taking you to the city’s most important monuments. Hop on and off whenever and wherever you please!
Buses run daily, approximately every 30 minutes at 11 different bus route stops between 9:00 AM and 6:30 PM. The entire loop, without stops, takes about two hours in good traffic. On board, a very informative audio-guide will supply you with the unique history behind Rome’s visual splendor, providing plenty of information to enrich your experience. This tour is tape-recorded with individual earphones. 

In the afternoon, taste your way through Rome, teasing your sweet tooth with the best food in town. Guided by a local food connoisseur, check out the best of the best: renowned coffee shops, gelaterias, and, the grand finale, the most famous tiramisù shop in town.

Overnight in Rome. 

Meals : Breakfast
Day 6: Rome

Spend the morning at leisure before experiencing the Imperial Rome Tour this afternoon. This fascinating three-hour tour covers ancient Rome’s major monuments including the Forum, the Arch of Constantine, Capitoline Hill, and the Sacred Way. The highlight of the afternoon is a guided inside visit of the Colosseum, where you can relive the bloody yet captivating history of this extraordinary monument.

Overnight in Rome.

Meals : Breakfast
Day 7: Departure

Begin your morning with breakfast at your hotel. 

You will be transferred to your hotel at the appropriate time depending on your departing flight schedule. 

Meals : Breakfast

Greece

Visas

All citizens (even infants) of the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand need only a valid passport to enter Greece for stays of up to 90 days. Your passport should be valid for at least three months beyond the period of your stay.

Currency & Exchange

Greece uses the euro. Under the euro system, there are eight coins: 1 and 2 euros, plus 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 euro cents. Euros are pronounced "evros" in Greek; cents are known as "lepta." All coins have the euro value on one side; the other side has each country's unique national symbol. Greece's images range from triremes to a depiction of the mythological Europa being abducted by Zeus transformed as a bull. Bills (banknotes) come in seven denominations: 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 500 euros. Bills are the same for all EU countries.

Off Syntagma Square in Athens, the National Bank of Greece, Alpha Bank, and Pireos Bank have automated machines that change your foreign currency into euros. When you shop, remember that it's always easier to bargain on prices when paying in cash instead of by credit card.

If you do use an exchange service, good options are American Express and Eurochange. Watch daily fluctuations and shop around.

Tipping

At Restaurants: It is customary to tip maximum 5–10 percent depending on the amount of the bill (10 percent for an inexpensive bill, and 5 percent for a more expensive meal).

Our suggestions for daily tipping are the following:

Drivers: $ 2.00 to $ 5.00

Tour Guide: $ 10.00 to $ 20.00

House Keepers: $ 2.00

Porters: $ 1.00 per luggge

Health

Greece's strong summer sun and low humidity can lead to sunburn or sunstroke if you're not careful. A hat, a light-color long-sleeve shirt, and long pants or a sarong are advised for spending a day at the beach or visiting archaeological sites. Sunglasses, a hat, and sunscreen are necessities, and be sure to drink plenty of water. Most beaches present few dangers, but keep a lookout for the occasional jellyfish and, on rocky coves, sea urchins. Should you step on one, don't break off the embedded spines, which may lead to infection, but instead remove them with heated olive oil and a needle. Food is seldom a problem, but the liberal amounts of olive oil used in Greek cooking may be indigestible for some. Tap water in Greece is fine in most urban areas, and bottled spring water is readily available. Avoid drinking tap water in many rural areas.

In greener, wetter areas, mosquitoes may be a problem. In addition to wearing insect repellent, you can burn coils ("spee-rahl") or buy plug-in devices that burn medicated tabs ("pah-steel-ya"). Hotels usually provide these. Citronella candles are usually an effective and more natural way to keep insects away. The only poisonous snakes in Greece are the adder and the sand viper, which are brown or red, with dark zigzags. The adder has a V or X behind its head, and the sand viper sports a small horn on its nose. When hiking, wear high tops and hiking socks and don't put your feet or hands in crevices without looking first. If bitten, try to slow the spread of the venom until a doctor comes. Lie still with the affected limb lower than the rest of your body. Apply a tourniquet, releasing it every few minutes, and cut the wound a bit in case the venom can bleed out. Do NOT suck on the bite. Whereas snakes like to lie in the sun, the scorpion (rare) likes cool, wet places, in woodpiles and under stones. Apply Benadryl or Phenergan to minor stings, but if you have nausea or fever, see a doctor at once.

Water

Tap water is drinkable and safe in much of Greece but not always in small villages and on some of the islands. Always ask locally if the water is safe and, if in doubt, drink boiled or bought water. Even when water is safe, the substances and bacteria in it may be different from those you are used to and can cause vomiting or diarrhea. Bottled water is widely available.

Electricity

The electrical current in Greece is 220 volts, 50 cycles AC. Wall outlets take Continental-type plugs with two round oversize prongs. If your appliances are dual-voltage, you'll need only an adapter; if not, you'll also need a step-down converter/transformer (United States and Canada).

Consider making a small investment in a universal adapter, which has several types of plugs in one lightweight, compact unit. Most laptops and mobile phone chargers are dual voltage (i.e., they operate equally well on 110 and 220 volts) so require only an adapter. These days the same is true of small appliances such as hair dryers. Always check labels and manufacturer instructions to be sure. Don't use 110-volt outlets marked "for shavers only" for high-wattage appliances such as hair dryers.

Pack lightly

Do not take much luggage with you because the trip might be long. Getting on and off planes or ferries will be very tiring if you have to drag your over-packed suitcase. Moreover, the paths in the islands are paved and it will difficult to carry many things. After all, you will not need but a couple of swimming suits, some light summer clothes and a couple of flat shoes or comfortable sneakers for walking. Also have a light sweater for some chilly evenings because the wind blows often in the islands. 

Italy 

Visas & Passports

U.S. citizens need only a valid passport to enter Italy for stays of up to 90 days. When staying for 90 days or less, U.S. citizens aren't required to obtain a visa prior to traveling to Italy. 

Currency

The euro is the main unit of currency in Italy. Under the euro system there are 100 centesimi (cents) to the euro. There are coins valued at 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 centesimi as well as 1 and 2 euros. There are seven notes: 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 500 euros. At this writing, €1 was worth was about $1.26.

Post offices exchange currency at good rates, but employees speak limited English, so be prepared. (Writing your request can help in these cases.)

Even if a currency-exchange booth has a sign promising no commission, rest assured that there's some kind of huge, hidden fee. You're almost always better off getting foreign currency at an ATM or exchanging money at a bank or post office.

Tipping

At Restaurants: Leave as close to 10 percent as is convenient, but no more.

U.S. dollars are always accepted as tips, but euros are much preferred

Our suggestions for daily tipping are the following:

Drivers: $ 2.00 to $ 5.00

Tour Guide: $ 10.00 to $ 20.00

House Keepers: $ 2.00

Porters: $ 1.00 per luggage

Electricity

The electrical current in Italy is 220 volts, 50 cycles alternating current (AC); wall outlets accept continental-type plugs, with two or three round prongs.

You may purchase a universal adapter, which has several types of plugs in one lightweight, compact unit, at travel specialty stores, electronics stores, and online. You can also pick up plug adapters in Italy in any electric supply store for about €2 each. You'll likely not need a voltage converter, though. Most portable devices are dual voltage (i.e., they operate equally well on 110 and 220 volts)—just check label specifications and manufacturer instructions to be sure. Don't use 110-volt outlets marked "for shavers only" for high-wattage appliances such as hair dryers.

Crime

Italy has a moderate rate of crime. Nevertheless, you should exercise extra caution at night and at train stations, airports, nightclubs, bars, and outdoor cafes.

Food and drink: 

Tap water is generally safe to drink. The inscription 'Acqua Non Potabile' means water is not drinkable. Milk is generally pasteurized and dairy products are safe for consumption. Local meat, poultry, seafood, fruit, vegetables and dairy products are considered safe to eat.

Health

Italy, with its amazing art and cultural sites, provides a memorable getaway for any traveler. Although there are no specific recommendations regarding vaccinations such as a hepatitis A vaccine or malaria medication for travel to Italy, it's imperative to be up to date on standard immunizations before attempting to travel in this beautiful Mediterranean region.

Clothing

Pack frugally, including dark and neutral separates that can be mixed and matched; choose items that may be worn two or three times. Italians tend to wear muted colors, so wearing bright colors screams "American Tourist" in the major cities. Include lightweight undergarments and footwear that can be hand-washed in the hotel sink using their shampoo. Pack two pairs of broken-in, dark-colored walking shoes for the cobble stone streets, ancient, uneven sidewalks and hill walking that you will find in every major Italian tourist area.

Diana Hotel

The Diana Hotel is a historical property opened in 1939 by Benedetto De Angelis, founder of one of the oldest and most famous family of the Roman hotellerie which is still managing the hotel nowadays. 

In the heart of the Umbertine Rome, a few meters from the Opera House, Termini station and easily accessible by Metro, the Hotel Diana offers a prime location close to the historical center, the most important monuments and museums of the city, and the most famous shopping streets. 

The Diana Hotel has always been an important point for those traveling for business or leisure and welcoming its guests in a pleasant and elegant atmosphere. 

Titania Hotel

Located at Panepistimiou Avenue, near Syntagma Square, right in the heart of the Historical and Commercial Centre of Athens, the recently renovated Titania Hotel creates its own "page" in the history of hospitality. 

The Titania Athens Hotel is surrounded by the most important monuments of the Grecian History, such as the Acropolis, the New Museum of Acropolis, the Parliament, the Archaeological Museum, and the National Library. It is located within short distance to theaters, modern commercial shops and city malls, offering its guests a wide variety of sightseeing and entertainment choices.Located at Panepistimiou Avenue, near Syntagma square, right in the heart of the Historical and Commercial Centre of Athens, the recently renovated Titania Hotel creates its own "page" in the history of Hospitality. 

The Titania Athens hotel is surrounded by the most important monuments of the Grecian History, such as the Acropolis, the New Museum of Acropolis, the Parliament, the Archaeological Museum, and the National Library. It is located within short distance to theaters, modern commercial shops and city malls, offering its guests a wide variety of sightseeing and entertainment choices.

Athens

Rome